Fall 2011 Graduate Seminars

Eng 599R: Master's Thesis
Reiss, TBA, TBA, Max: 999

(Written Permission of DGS required prior to Enrollment)

Eng 700R: Studies in Old English Literature
Morey, MWF 9:35-10:25, Max: 12

Content: One semester of intensive language study will result in a proficient reading knowledge of the West Saxon dialect (standard Old English) such that we can explore the culture of the Anglo-Saxons and better understand the language we speak today.  Selections from heroic and religious poetry and prose will begin with the first known poem in the English language and will also include the Wanderer and Seafarer, the Battle of Maldon, the Dream of the Rood, Ælfric's preface to Genesis, and King Alfred's lament over the faded glory of English learning.  Classes consist of prepared translation, short lectures, and discussion.  The standard lexicographic and bibliographic tools in Old English will be covered.  Some previous foreign language study is desirable but not required; students should be prepared to use a glossary.  Depending on student interest, the class may continue with the reading of Beowulf in the spring.
           
Particulars: Grammar and translation quizzes, midterm, final, class presentation. English 300 may NOT be used to fulfill the undergraduate writing requirement.

(Written Permission of DGS required prior to Enrollment)

Eng 717R: Milton: Milton and Modernity
Goldberg, W 1:00-4:00, Max: 12

Content: Philosophical, aesthetic, and political contexts for Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes.

(Written Permission of DGS required prior to Enrollment)

Eng 751R: Studies in Nineteenth-Century American Literature
Allewaert, Th 4:00-7:00, Max: 12

Content:

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Particulars:

(Written Permission of DGS required prior to Enrollment)

Eng 752R: Studies in Twentieth-Century American Literature: William Faulkner and the 20th Century
Ladd, Tu 19:00-1:00, Max: 12      

Content: An intensive reading and study of Faulkner and 20th century intellectual contexts to be determined by student interests. In the past, those interests have included modernism, language and narrative, race, gender, state and nation, Americas [as well as American] Studies . Primary texts include The Sound and The Fury, As I Lay Dying, Absalom, Absalom!, Light in August, The Hamlet, and Go Down, Moses. Students should come away from this seminar with a better understanding of U.S. literary history and the inquiries that are shaping work in the field of American literature at present. The format of the course encourages students to pursue their study of Faulkner by way of individual interests (whether in gender, race, cultural studies, comparatist studies, or in the always-eagerly-anticipated "other").

Requirements:  We will spend the first six weeks reading the six novels. Students write 6 short essays (i.e. 300-500 words each), one on each novel. The following two weeks will be devoted to preparing and hearing student reviews-each student selects one important book-length scholarly or critical study and writes a substantive review (1200-1500 words) for presentation to the class. The final course requirement is an annotated bibliography with an introductory essay on a Faulkner or Faulkner-related subject of your choice (3000-5000 words). Here you may focus on the scholarship and criticism of one of Faulkner's novels, a study of his work in general, a comparatist study of Faulkner and another writer, or tackle an issue of scholarship or criticism or theory important to the study of Faulkner. To be presented to the class for discussion. (An alternative final project is a seminar paper, encouraged for second-year students.)

Texts:  The Faulkner novels listed above (Random House, Vintage editions), supplementary readings tba.


(Written Permission of DGS required prior to Enrollment)


Eng 789R: Special Topics in Literature: Call and Response
Byrd, W 9:00-12:00, Max: 6    Eng 789R/ILA 790

Content: Theorizing Culture, Race and Gender in Racial Formations. As an introductory Prose Seminar in African American Studies, this seminar is designed to meet the intellectual aspirations and research needs of graduate students in African American Studies, and it is open to all graduate students who are interested in the study and theory of race, culture and gender in African American Studies. Drawing upon texts in Anthropology, Sociology, Cultural Studies, Women's Studies, Literary Studies, and Film Studies, this seminar also seeks to introduce graduate students to canonical as well as new works in these areas of critical inquiry and to situate them within the field of African American Studies.

Texts: Include Alain Locke's The New Negro; Melville Herskovitz's The Myth of the Negro Past; E. Franklin Frazier's The Black Bourgeoisie; Albert Murray's The Omni-Americans; Patricia Hill Collins' Fighting Words; B. Sheftall and J. Cole's Gender Talk; Stuart Hall's Critical Dialogues in Cultural Studies; W. E. B. Du Bois' Dusk of Dawn, and Anthony Appiah's In My Father's House.

(Written Permission of DGS required prior to Enrollment)

Eng 789R: Special Topics in Literature: Media Technology
Johnston, Tu 4:00-7:00, Max: 6    Eng 789R/CPLT 751


Content:

(Written Permission of DGS required prior to Enrollment)

Eng 789R: Special Topics in Literature: Histories of the Book/Practices of Reading
Reed, Th 1:00-4:00, Max: 12   

Content: This course will explore the fields of book and reading history that have been emerging over the last half-century in literary studies, fields that range across historical periods and theories of literature, striving for more comprehensive understanding of the way imaginative writing has been produced, preserved and consumed over the centuries.  From the manuscript codex to the printed book to the digital text; from monastic scriptoria to commercial publishing houses and booksellers to open source data bases; from lectio divina to mass-private reading to rapid scansion of text on a screen:  the idealized concept of the literary work or ideological notion of the text has been challenged by a growing awareness of the materiality of books, the politics and economics of their distribution and the psycho-dynamics of readers' responses to them.  Greater interest in these dimensions of literature seems to have arisen as new technologies of communication have challenged the dominant print culture and raised the prospect that printed books will be marginalized within a new "media ecology."

Designed as a colloquium, the course will draw on the expertise of various members of the Emory English Department to present case histories of books and reading at particular historical moments in British and American literature.  It will also engage Emory librarians to bring their knowledge of collections and archives in the Manuscripts, Archives Rare Books Library to bear on the work of the class.  In between these focused presentations, the class will consider influential historical and theoretical contributions to these emerging fields, especially those collected in The Book History Reader, ed. David Finkelstein and Alistair McCleery, and A History of Reading in the West, ed. Guglielmo Cavallo, Roger Chartier and Lydia G. Cochrane. The virtuoso reading of Jorge Luis Borges and his disciple Alberto Manguel will also figure in our deliberations.  

(Written Permission of DGS required prior to Enrollment)


Eng 789R:Special Topics in Literature: Twentieth-Century Poetry: Places and Correspondences
Moon, W 1:00-4:00, Max: 4   Eng 789R/CPLT 751/ILA 790


Content: The course will explore questions of (geographical) place in modernist and contemporary poetry (e.g., Toomer's Georgia), as well as the place of the poets we read in each other's work (e.g., Pound in H.D.'s writing; H.D. in poets Robert Duncan's and Barbara Guest's books about her work).  Readings to be chosen from among the following: Frost, Pound, H.D., Toomer, Hughes, Auden, Bishop, Brooks.

(Written Permission of DGS required prior to Enrollment)

Eng 796R: Survey of English: Histories, Theories, and Methods
Kelleher, W 4:00-7:00, Max: 12

Content:

Texts:

(Written Permission of DGS required prior to Enrollment)

Eng 797R: Directed Study
Reiss, TBA, Max: 999

(Written Permission of DGS required prior to Enrollment)

Eng 798R: Dissertation Colloquium
Johnston, W 10:00-1:00, Max: 12  

(Written Permission of DGS required prior to Enrollment)

Eng 799R: Doctoral Dissertation
Reiss, TBA, Max: 999

(Written Permission of DGS required prior to Enrollment)